Civil War Cavalry Organization

Thomas' Legion
American Civil War HOMEPAGE
American Civil War
Causes of the Civil War : What Caused the Civil War
Organization of Union and Confederate Armies: Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery
Civil War Navy: Union Navy and Confederate Navy
American Civil War: The Soldier's Life
Civil War Turning Points
American Civil War: Casualties, Battles and Battlefields
Civil War Casualties, Fatalities & Statistics
Civil War Generals
American Civil War Desertion and Deserters: Union and Confederate
Civil War Prisoner of War: Union and Confederate Prison History
Civil War Reconstruction Era and Aftermath
American Civil War Genealogy and Research
Civil War
American Civil War Pictures - Photographs
African Americans and American Civil War History
American Civil War Store
American Civil War Polls
NORTH CAROLINA HISTORY
North Carolina Civil War History
North Carolina American Civil War Statistics, Battles, History
North Carolina Civil War History and Battles
North Carolina Civil War Regiments and Battles
North Carolina Coast: American Civil War
HISTORY OF WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA
Western North Carolina and the American Civil War
Western North Carolina: Civil War Troops, Regiments, Units
North Carolina: American Civil War Photos
Cherokee Chief William Holland Thomas
HISTORY OF THE CHEROKEE INDIANS
Cherokee Indian Heritage, History, Culture, Customs, Ceremonies, and Religion
Cherokee Indians: American Civil War
History of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indian Nation
Cherokee War Rituals, Culture, Festivals, Government, and Beliefs
Researching your Cherokee Heritage
Civil War Diary, Memoirs, Letters, and Newspapers
American Civil War Store: Books, DVDs, etc.

American Civil War Cavalry Organization

During the American Civil War, the cavalry was organized into divisions, brigades, regiments, and troops or companies of soldiers with horses. The sizes of these groups are summarized below. The largest cavalry battle ever fought in the Americas was the Battle of Brandy Station; it involved approximately 17,000 cavalry. (See also United States Cavalry History and Civil War Cavalry.)
 
Division
Commanded by Brigadier or Major General
2-5 Brigades
2,400-18,000 men
 
Brigade
Commanded by Colonel/Brigadier General
2-5 Regiments
1,200-3,800 men
 
Regiment
Commanded by Colonel
Normally 10 Companies
400-1,000 men
 
Troop or Company
Commanded by Captain
40-100 men and horses
 
Try our internal search engine, type, for examples: Cavalry, Cavalry Engagement, Cavalry Charge, Cavalry Experience, Cavalry Battle, Gettysburg Cavalry, etc.

Recommended Reading: The Cavalry at Gettysburg: A Tactical Study of Mounted Operations during the Civil War's Pivotal Campaign, 9 June-14 July 1863. Description: "For cavalry and/or Gettysburg enthusiasts, this book is a must; for other Civil War buffs, it possesses the qualities sought by students of the conflict. . . . [It] bristles with analysis, details, judgments, personality profiles, and evaluations and combat descriptions, even down to the squadron and company levels. The mounted operations of the campaign from organizational, strategic, and tactical viewpoints are examined thoroughly. Continued below...

The author's graphic recountings of the Virginia fights at Brandy Station, Aldie, Middleburg, and Upperville, the Pennsylvania encounters at Hanover, Hunterstown, Gettysburg, and Fairfield, and finally the retreat to Virginia, are the finest this reviewer has read under a single cover. For those who enjoy the thunder of hoofbeats, the clang of sabers, and the crack of pistols and carbines, this book has all of it. Generals and privates share the pages, as the mounted opponents parry and thrust across hundreds of miles of territory from June 9 to July 14, 1863."-Civil War Times Illustrated (Civil War Times Illustrated).
Site search Web search

Advance to:
 

Recommended Reading: Nathan Bedford Forrest: In Search of the Enigma (Hardcover) (528 pages). Description: Nathan Bedford Forrest’s astounding military abilities, passionate temperament, and tactical ingenuity on the battlefield have earned the respect of Civil War scholars and military leaders alike. He was a man who stirred the most extreme emotions among his followers and his enemies, and his name continues to inspire controversy. In this comprehensive biography, Forrest is properly illuminated as the brilliant battlefield tactician--and the only Confederate cavalry leader feared by Gen. Ulysses S. Grant. Historians Eddy W. Davison and Daniel Foxx offer a detailed explanation of the Fort Pillow "Massacre" unraveling the facts to prove that it was not indeed a massacre. The book also discusses Forrest’s role in the Ku Klux Klan and how he came to be its first grand wizard. Continued below...

Dispelling several myths, this is a study of the complete Forrest, including his rise as a self-made millionaire in Memphis, his remarkable success leading the Seventh Tennessee Cavalry, and his life following the Civil War. Although the book is filled with vivid battle narratives, it goes beyond Forrest’s military life to examine other aspects of this enigmatic leader—his role as husband and father, for example, and his dramatic call for full citizenship for Black Southerners. Edwin C. Bearss, historian emeritus, National Park Service, states: "Recommended as must reading for those who want to know Forrest and his way of war."
 
Recommended Reading: Civil War Cavalry & Artillery Sabers (Swords) (Hardcover). Description: The ultimate guide to sabers of the Civil War. This huge resource is easily the most important sword book written in decades, and is lavishly illustrated with 1,400 photographs, 60 of them in color. An important extra feature is that it also includes all sabers from the prewar period, right back to 1833. Every make and every known variation is covered with full history, tables and illustrations. Photographs include hundreds of close-ups showing the small features that tell one saber apart from the others. A truly groundbreaking work. Several photos not seen. Each photo is accompanied by a detailed description.
 
Recommended Reading: The 1862 U S Cavalry Tactics (Stackpole Military Classic) (Hardcover: 416 pages). Description: Directed by the U.S. War Department in 1859 to prepare a new, revised manual for U.S. cavalry operations, then-Col. Philip St. George Cooke produced this book after extensive research of cavalry tactics used by the advanced nations in Europe, where he had been an observer in the Crimean War (1854-1856). Originally published in 1860, the book was revised in 1861 and 1862. This 1862 Government Printing Office edition combines the former two-volume work into one book. Continued below...
About the Author: Colonel (later Major General) Philip St. George Cooke (1809-1895) was a West Point Class of 1827 graduate and a thirty-year cavalry veteran. Although a Virginian, Cooke remained in federal service during the Civil War, even though his son joined the Confederacy and his daughter was the wife of Confederate General J. E. B. Stuart.
 
 

Recommended Reading: Small Arms at Gettysburg: Infantry and Cavalry Weapons in America's Greatest Battle (Hardcover). Description: The three-day battle of Gettysburg has probably been the subject of more books and articles than any other comparable event. Surprisingly, until this work, no one has analyzed the firearms and other individual soldier's weapons used at Gettysburg in any great detail. The battle was a watershed, with military weapons technologies representing the past, present, and future--sabers, smoothbores, rifles, and breechloaders--in action alongside each other, providing a unique opportunity to compare performance and use, as well as determining how particular weapons and their deployment affected the outcome and course of the battle. Continued below...

Small Arms at Gettysburg: Infantry and Cavalry Weapons in America's Greatest Battle covers all of the individual soldier's weapons--muskets, rifle-muskets, carbines, repeaters, sharpshooter arms, revolvers, and swords--providing a detailed examination of their history and development, technology, capabilities, and use on the field at Gettysburg. Here we learn that the smoothbore musket, although beloved by some who carried it, sang its swan song, the rifle-musket began to come into its own, and the repeating rifle, although tactically mishandled, gave a glimpse of future promise. This is the story of the weapons and men who carried them into battle during three days in July 1863.

Try the Search Engine for Related Studies: Civil War Cavalry Organization History, Photo, Pictures Union Confederate Cavalry Structure Strategy and Tactics, Civil War Cavalry Battles, Casualties, Results, Mounted Units, Regiments and Troops, Details, Gettysburg Cavalry Photograph.

Return to American Civil War Homepage

Best viewed with Google Chrome

Google Safe.jpg