North Carolina Total Slaves By County (1790-1860)

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North Carolina Slave Totals by County

Total North Carolina Slaves in Each County (1790-1860)*

North Carolina: TOTAL SLAVES
County 1790 1800 1810 1820 1830 1840 1850 1860
ALAMANCE 0 0 0 0 0 0 3,196 3,445
ALEXANDER 0 0 0 0 0 0 543 611
ALLEGHANY 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 206
ANSON 829 1,290 2,325 3,476 4,778 5,304 6,832 6,951
ASHE 0 85 147 250 492 497 595 391
AVERY 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
BEAUFORT 1,622 2,044 2,568 3,655 4,165 4,472 5,249 5,878
BERTIE 5,121 5,512 6,059 5,725 6,797 6,728 7,194 8,185
BLADEN 1,686 2,299 1,985 2,788 3,122 3,413 4,358 5,327
BRUNSWICK 1,511 1,614 2,254 2,334 3,107 2,119 3,302 3,631
BUNCOMBE 0 347 695 1,042 1,666 1,199 1,717 1,933
BURKE 600 826 1,433 1,917 3,626 3,216 2,132 2,371
CABARRUS 0 699 1,234 1,599 2,258 2,179 2,685 3,040
CALDWELL 0 0 0 0 0 0 1,203 1,088
CAMDEN 1,038 1,170 1,411 1,749 2,025 1,661 2,187 2,127
CARTERET 709 918 1,172 1,329 1,593 1,360 1,623 1,969
CASWELL 2,736 2,788 4,299 5,417 6,434 7,024 7,770 9,355
CATAWBA 0 0 0 0 0 0 1,569 1,664
CHATHAM 1,558 2,809 3,635 3,808 5,056 5,316 5,985 6,246
CHEROKEE 0 0 0 0 0 199 337 519
CHOWAN 2,587 2,473 2,789 3,469 3,768 3,665 3,673 3,713
CLAY 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
CLEVELAND 0 0 0 0 0 0 1,747 2,131
COLUMBUS 0 0 703 913 1,079 1,086 1,503 2,463
CRAVEN 3,663 4,161 5,050 5,087 6,129 5,702 5,951 6,189
CUMBERLAND 2,180 2,723 2,796 4,751 5,057 5,392 7,217 5,830
CURRITUCK 1,103 1,530 1,631 1,854 2,188 2,100 2,447 2,523
DARE 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
County 1790 1800 1810 1820 1830 1840 1850 1860
DAVIDSON 0 0 0 0 1,918 2,538 2,992 3,076
DAVIE 0 0 0 0 0 1,888 2,171 2,392
DOBBS 2,012 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
DUPLIN 1,386 1,864 2,416 3,599 4,434 4,677 6,007 7,124
DURHAM 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
EDGECOMBE 3,167 3,905 5,107 5,745 7,075 7,439 8,547 10,108
FORSYTH 0 0 0 0 0 0 1,353 1,764
FRANKLIN 2,701 3,698 5,330 4,709 4,960 5,320 5,507 7,076
GASTON 0 0 0 0 0 0 2,112 2,199
GATES 2,217 2,688 2,790 2,685 3,648 3,642 3,871 3,901
GRAHAM 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
GRANVILLE 4,163 6,106 7,746 9,071 9,166 8,707 9,865 11,086
GREENE 0 1,496 1,842 2,174 2,872 2,971 3,244 3,947
GUILFORD 616 905 1,467 1,611 2,594 2,647 3,186 3,625
HALIFAX 6,697 7,239 6,624 9,450 9,790 9,405 8,954 10,349
HARNETT 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2,584
HAYWOOD 0 0 171 274 291 304 418 313
HENDERSON 0 0 0 0 0 466 924 1,382
HERTFORD 2,448 2,864 2,805 3,244 3,710 3,298 3,716 4,445
HOKE 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
HYDE 1,143 1,404 1,852 1,580 1,943 2,198 2,627 2,791
IREDELL 868 1,508 2,432 2,988 3,682 3,716 4,142 4,177
JACKSON 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 268
JOHNSTON 1,328 1,763 2,330 3,086 3,639 3,476 4,663 4,916
JONES 1,655 1,949 2,375 2,764 3,075 2,818 2,757 3,413
LEE 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
LENOIR 0 1,526 2,440 3,354 3,919 3,683 4,116 5,140
LILLINGTON 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3,228
LINCOLN 855 1,523 2,489 3,329 4,882 5,386 2,055 2,115
MACON 0 0 0 0 458 368 549 519
County 1790 1800 1810 1820 1830 1840 1850 1860
MADISON 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 213
MARTIN 1,829 1,786 2,357 2,850 3,279 2,816 3,367 4,309
MCDOWELL 0 0 0 0 0 0 1,262 1,305
MECKLENBURG 1,608 1,988 3,494 5,181 7,146 6,322 5,473 6,541
MITCHELL 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
MONTGOMERY 837 1,373 1,696 1,815 2,295 2,487 1,773 1,823
MOORE 371 608 944 1,296 1,673 1,472 1,976 2,518
NASH 2,008 2,596 2,897 3,445 3,706 3,697 4,056 4,680
NEW HANOVER 3,737 4,058 6,442 5,561 5,616 6,376 8,581 7,103
NORTHAMPTON 4,414 6,209 7,258 7,263 7,242 6,759 6,511 6,804
ONSLOW 1,747 1,814 2,299 2,777 3,144 2,739 3,108 3,499
ORANGE 2,060 3,565 4,701 6,153 7,373 6,954 5,244 5,108
PAMLICO 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
PASQUOTANK 1,600 1,755 2,295 2,616 2,621 2,788 3,105 2,983
PENDER 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
PERQUIMANS 1,883 2,020 2,017 2,465 2,749 2,943 3,252 3,558
PERSON 0 2,082 2,573 3,674 4,432 4,351 4,893 5,195
PITT 2,364 2,885 3,589 4,241 5,365 5,648 6,633 8,473
POLK 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 620
RANDOLPH 460 607 798 1,080 1,462 1,407 1,640 1,645
RICHMOND 583 875 1,301 2,021 3,512 3,880 4,704 5,453
ROBESON 533 998 1,340 2,099 2,499 2,885 4,365 5,455
ROCKINGHAM 1,113 1,633 2,114 2,974 4,296 4,572 5,329 6,318
ROWAN 1,741 2,839 3,757 5,381 6,189 3,365 3,854 3,930
RUTHERFORD 609 1,072 979 3,321 3,388 3,201 2,905 2,391
SAMPSON 1,177 1,712 2,049 2,857 3,884 4,425 5,685 7,028
SCOTLAND 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
STANLY 0 0 0 0 0 0 1,436 1,169
STOKES 778 1,439 1,746 2,204 2,841 2,682 1,793 2,469
SURRY 692 1,005 1,469 1,365 1,945 1,778 2,000 1,246
County 1790 1800 1810 1820 1830 1840 1850 1860
SWAIN 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
TRANSYLVANIA 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
TYRRELL 1,156 859 910 1,261 1,391 1,411 1,702 1,597
UNION 0 0 0 0 0 0 1,982 2,246
VANCE 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
WAKE 2,472 424 5,878 7,417 8,109 7,996 9,409 10,733
WARREN 4,713 6,012 6,282 6,754 7,327 8,200 8,867 10,401
WASHINGTON 0 761 1,287 1,667 1,712 1,727 2,215 2,465
WATAUGA 0 0 0 0 0 0 129 104
WAYNE 1,546 1,988 2,756 3,162 3,517 3,673 5,020 5,451
WILKES 553 790 1,194 1,191 1,492 1,430 1,142 1,208
WILSON 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3,496
YADKIN 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1,436
YANCEY 0 0 0 0 0 237 346 362

Source: United States Census
 
*Editor's Notes: North Carolina comprised 86 counties in 1860; presently there are 100 counties. Some counties, through the years, have consolidated with neighboring counties.

Recommended Reading: The SLAVE TRADE: THE STORY OF THE ATLANTIC SLAVE TRADE: 1440 - 1870. School Library Journal: Thomas concentrates on the economics, social acceptance, and politics of the slave trade. The scope of the book is amazingly broad as the author covers virtually every aspect of the subject from the early days of the 16th century when great commercial houses were set up throughout Europe to the 1713 Peace Treaty of Utrecht, which gave the British the right to import slaves into the Spanish Indies. The account includes the anti-slavery patrols of the 19th century and the final decline and abolition in the early 20th century. Continued below...

Through the skillful weaving of numerous official reports, financial documents, and firsthand accounts, Thomas explains how slavery was socially acceptable and shows that people and governments everywhere were involved in it. This book is a comprehensive study from African kings and Arab slave traders to the Europeans and Americans who bought and transported them to the New World. Despite the volatility of the subject, the author remains emotionally detached in his writing, yet produces a highly readable, informative book. A superb addition and highly recommended.

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Recommended Reading: Inhuman Bondage: The Rise and Fall of Slavery in the New World. Description: Winner of a Pulitzer Prize and a National Book Award, David Brion Davis has long been recognized as the leading authority on slavery in the Western World. Now, in Inhuman Bondage, Davis sums up a lifetime of insight in this definitive account of New World slavery. The heart of the book looks at slavery in the American South, describing black slaveholding planters, rise of the Cotton Kingdom, daily life of ordinary slaves, highly destructive slave trade, sexual exploitation of slaves, emergence of an African-American culture, abolition, abolitionists, antislavery movements, and much more. Continued below…

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