Battle of Chancellorsville: Confederate Order of Battle: Army of Northern Virginia

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Battle of Chancellorsville: Confederate Army

Chancellorsville Order of Battle (ANV)
Commanding General ROBERT E. LEE

FIRST CORPS

McLAWS' DIVISION
Maj. Gen. LAFAYETTE MCLAWS

Wofford's Brigade
Brig. Gen. W. T. WOFFORD

16th Georgia.
18th Georgia.
24th Georgia.
Cobb's Georgia Legion.
Phillips' Georgia Legion.

Semmes' Brigade
Brig. Gen. PAUL J. SEMMES

10th Georgia, Lieut. Col. W. C. Holt.
50th Georgia, Lieut. Col. F. Kearse.
51st Georgia:
       Col. W. M. Slaughter.
       Lieut. Col. Edward Ball.
53d Georgia, Col. James P. Simms.

Kershaw' s Brigade
Brig. Gen. JOSEPH B. KERSHAW

2d South Carolina, Col. John D. Kennedy
3d South Carolina, Maj. R. C. Maffett.
7th South Carolina, Col. Elbert Bland.
8th South Carolina, Col. John W. Henagan.
15th South Carolina, Lieut. Col. Joseph F. Gist.
3d South Carolina Battalion, lieut. Col. W. G. Rice.

Barksdale's Brigade
Brig. Gen. WILLIAM BARKSDALE

13th Mississippi, Col. J. W. Carter.
17th Mississippi, Col. W. D. Holder.
18th Mississippi, Col. Thomas M. Griffin.
21st Mississippi, Col. B. G. Humphreys.

Artillery
Col. C. H. CABELL

Carlton's (Georgia) battery (Troup Artillery).
Fraser's (Georgia) battery.
McCarthy's (Virginia) battery (1st Howitzers).
Manly's (North Carolina) battery.

ANDERSON'S DIVISION
Maj. Gen. RICHARD H. ANDERSON

Wilcox's Brigade
Brig. Gen. C. M. WILCOX

8th Alabama:
       Col. Y. L. Royston.
       Lieut. Col. H. A. Herbert.
9th Alabama, Maj. J. H. J. Williams.
10th Alabama, Col. William H. Forney.
11th Alabama, Col. J. C. C. Sanders.
14th Alabama, Col. L. Pinckard.

Wright's Brigade
Brig. Gen. A. R. WRIGHT

3d Georgia:
       Maj. J. F. Jones.
       Capt. C. H. Andrews.
22d Georgia, Lieut. Col. J. Wasden.
48th Georgia, Lieut. Col. R. W. Carswell.
2d Georgia Battalion, Maj. George W. Rosa.

Mahone' s Brigade
Brig. Gen. WILLIAM MAHONE

6th Virginia, Col. George T. Rogers.
12th Virginia, Lieut. Col. E. M. Feild.
16th Virginia, Lieut. Col. R. O. Whitehead.
41st Virginia, Col. William Allen Parham.
61st Virginia, Col. V. D. Groner.

Posey's Brigade
Brig. Gen. CARNOT POSEY

12th Mississippi:
       Lieut. Col. M. B. Harris.
       Maj. S. B. Thomas.
16th Mississippi, Col. Samuel E. Baker.
19th Mississippi, Col. N. H. Harris.
48th Mississippi, Col. Joseph M. Jayne.

Perry's Brigade
Brig. Gen. E. A. PERRY

2d Florida.
5th Florida.
8th Florida.

Artillery
Lieut. Col. J, J, GARNETT

Grandy's (Virginia) battery.
Lewis' (Virginia) battery.
Maurin's (Louisiana) battery
Moore's [formerly Huger's] (Virginia) battery.

ARTILLERY RESERVE

Alexander' s Battalion
Col. E. P. ALEXANDER

Eubank's (Virginia) battery.
Jordan's (Virginia) battery.
Moody's (Louisiana) battery.
Parker's (Virginia) battery.
Rhett's (South Carolina) battery.
Woolfolk's (Virginia) battery.

Washington (La.) Artillery
Col. J. B. WALTON

Eshleman's 4th Company.
Miller's 3d Company.
Richardson's 2d Company.
Squires' 1st Company.
>

SECOND CORPS
(1) Lieut. Gen. THOMAS J. JACKSON
(2) Maj. Gen. AMBROSE P. HILL
(3) Brig. Gen. R. E. RODES
(4) Maj. Gen. J. E. B. STUART

HILL'S DIVISION
(1) Maj. Gen. A. P. HILL
(2) Brig. Gen. HENRY HETH
(3) Brig. Gen. W. D. PENDER
(4) Brig. Gen. J. J. ARCHER

Heth's Brigade
1) Brig. Gen. HENRY HETH

2) Col. J. M. BROCKENBROUGH

40th Virginia:
       Col. J. M. Brockenbrough.
       Lieut. Col. F. W. Cox.
       Capt. T. E. Betts.
47th Virginia, Col. Robert M. Mayo.
55th Virginia:
       Col. Francis Mallory.
       Lieut. Col. William S. Christian.
       Maj. A. D. Saunders.
       Adjt. R. L. Williams.
       Maj. Evan Rice.
22d Virginia Battalion, Lieut. Col. E. P. Tayloe.

Thomas' Brigade
Brig. Gen. E. L. THOMAS

14th Georgia, Col. R. W. Folsom.
35th Georgia, Capt. John Duke.
45th Georgia, Lieut. Col. W. L. Grice.
49th Georgia, Maj. S. T. Player.

Lane's (Fourth) Brigade
Brig. Gen. JAMES H. LANE

7th North Carolina:
       Col. E. G. Haywood.
       Lieut. Col. J. L. Hill.
       Maj. William L Davidson.
       Capt. N. A. Pool.
18th North Carolina:
       Col. Thomas J. Purdie.
       Lieut. Col. F. George.
       Maj. John D. Barry.
28th North Carolina:
       Col. S. D. Lowe.
       Capt. Edward F. Lovill.
33d North Carolina:
       Col. Clark M. Avery.
       Capt. Joseph H. Saunders.
37th North Carolina, Col. W. M. Barbour.

McGowan's Brigade
(1) Brig. Gen. S. McGOWN
(2) Col. O. E. EDWARDS
(3) Col. A. PERRIN
(4) Col. D. H. HAMILTON

1st South Carolina (Provisional Army):
       Col. D. H. Hamilton.
       Capt. W. P. Shooter.
1st South Carolina Rifles
       Col. James M. Perrin.
       Lieut. Col. F. E. Harrison
12th South Carolina.
13th South Carolina:
       Col. O. E. Edwards.
       Lieut. Col. B. T. Brockman.
14th South Carolina,  Col. A. Perrin.

Archer's (Fifth) Brigade.
(1)Brig. Gen. J. J. ARCHER

(2) Col. B. D. FRY

13th Alabama, Col. B. D. Fry.
5th Alabama Battalion:
       Capt. S. D. Stewart.
       Capt. A. N. Porter.
1st Tennessee (Provisional Army), Lieut. Col. N. J. George.
7th Tennessee, Lieut. Col. John A. Fite.
14th Tennessee:
       Col. William McComb.
       Capt. R. C. Wilson.

Pender's Brigade
Brig. Gen. W. D. PENDER

13th North Carolina:
       Col. A.M. Scales.
       Lieut. Col. J. H. Hyman.
16th North Carolina:
       Col. John S. McElroy.
Lieut. Col. William A. Stowe.
       22d North Carolina,
       Lieut. Col. Chris C. Cole.
34th North Carolina.
38th North Carolina,
       Lieut. CoL John Ashford.

Artillery
Col. R. L. WALKER

Brunson's (South Carolina) battery.
Crenshaw's (Virginia) battery.
Davidson's (Virginia) battery (Letcher Artillery).
McGraw's (Virginia) battery.
Marye's (Virginia) battery.

D. H. HILL'S DIVISION
(1) Brig. Gen. R. E. RODES
(2) Brig. Gen. S. D. RAMSEUR

Rodes' Brigade
(1) Brig. Gen. R. E. RODES

(2) Col. E. A. O'NEAL
(3) Col. J. M. HALL

3d Alabama, Capt. M. F. Bonham.
5th Alabama:
       Col. J. M. Hall.
       Lieut. Col. E. L. Hobson.
       Capt. W. T. Renfro.
       Capt. T. M. Riley.
6th Alabama, Col. James N. Lightfoot.
12th Alabama, Col. Samuel B. Pickens.
26th Alabama:
       Col. E. A. O'Neal
       Lieut. Col. John S. Garvin.
       Lieut. M. J. Taylor.

Colquitt's Brigade
Brig. Gen. A. H. COLQUITT

6th Georgia, Col. John T. Lofton.
19th Georgia, Col. A. J. Hutchins.
23d Georgia, Col. Emory F. Best.
27th Georgia, Col. C. T. Zachry.
28th Georgia, Col. Tully Graybill.

Ramseur's Brigade
(1) Brig. Gen. S. D. RAMSEUR

(2) Col. F. M. PARKER.

2d North Carolina, Col. W. R. Cox.
4th North Carolina, Col. Bryan Grimes.
14th North Carolina, Col. R. T. Bennett.
30th North Carolina, Col. F. M. Parker.

Doles' Brigade
Brig. Gen. GEORGE DOLES

4th Georgia:
       Col. Philip Cook.
       Lieut. Col. D. R. E. Winn.
12th Georgia, Col. Edward Willis.
21st Georgia, Col. J. T. Mercer.
44th Georgia, Col. J. B. Estes.

Iverson's Brigade
Brig. Gen. ALFRED IVERSON

5th North Carolina:
       Col. Thomas M. Garrett.
       Lieut. Col. J. W. Lea.
       Maj. William J. Hill.
       Capt. S. B. West.
12th North Carolina:
       Maj. D. P. Rowe.
       Lieut. Col. R. D. Johnston, of the 23d North Carolina.
20th North Carolina:
       Col. T. F. Toon.
       Lieut. Col. N. Slough.
23d North Carolina, Col. D. H. Christie.

Artillery
Lieut. Col. T. H. CARTER

Reese's, formerly Bondurant's (Alabama) battery (Jeff. Davis Artillery).
Carter's (Virginia) battery (King William Artillery).
Fry's (Virginia) battery ('Orange Artillery).
Page's (Virginia) battery (Morris Artillery).

EARLY'S DIVISION
Maj. Gen. JUBAL A. EARLY

Gordon's Brigade
Brig. Gen. JOHN B. GORDON

13th Georgia.
26th Georgia.
31st Georgia.
38th Georgia.
60th Georgia.
61st Georgia.

Hoke's Brigade
Brig. Gen. ROBERT F. HOKE

6th North Carolina.
21st North Carolina.
54th North Carolina.
57th North Carolina.
1st North Carolina Battalion.

Smith's Brigade
Brig. Gen. WILLIAM SMITH

13th Virginia.
49th Virginia.
52d Virginia.
58th Virginia,
       Col. F. H. Board.

Hays' Brigade
Brig. Gen. HARRY T. HAYS

5th Louisiana.
6th Louisiana.
7th Louisiana.
8th Louisiana.
9th Louisiana.

Artillery
Lieut. Col. R. S. ANDREWS

Brown's (Maryland) battery (Chesapeake Artillery).
Carpenter's (Virginia) battery.
Dement's (Maryland) battery.
Raine's (Virginia) battery (Lee Artillery).

TRIMBLE'S DIVISION
Brig. Gen. R. E. COLSTON

Paxton's (First) Brigade
(1) Brig. Gen. E. F. PAXTON
(2) Col. J. H. S. FUNK

2d Virginia, Col. J. Q. A. Nadenbousch.
4th Virginia, Maj. William Terry.
5th Virginia:
       Col. J. H. S. Funk.
       Lieut. Col. H. J. Williams.
27th Virginia:
       Col. J. :K. Edmondson.
       Lieut. Col. D. M. Shriver.
33d Virginia, Col. A. Spengler.

Jones' ( Second) Brigade
(1) Brig. Gen. J. R. JONES
(2) Col. T. S. GARNETT
(3) Col. A. S. VANDEVENTER

21st Virginia, Capt. John B. Moseley.
42d Virginia, Lieut. Col. R. W. Withers.
44th Virginia:
       Maj. N. Cobb.
       Capt. Thomas R. Buckner.
48th Virginia:
       Col. T. S. Garnett.
       Maj. Oscar White.
50th Virginia:
       Col. A. S. Vandeventer.
       Maj. L. J. Perkins.
       Capt. Frank W. Kelly.

Colston's (Third) Brigade
(1) Col. E. T. H. WARREN
(2) Col. T. V. WILLIAMS
(3) Lieut. Col. S. T. WALKER
(4) Lieut. Col. S. D. THRUSTON
(5) Lieut. Col. H. A. BROWN

1st North Carolina, Col. J. A. McDowell.
3d North Carolina, Lieut. Col. S. D. Thruston.
10th Virginia:
       Col. E. T. H. Warren.
       Lieut. Col. S. T. Walker.
       Maj. Joshua Stover.
       Capt. A. H. Smals.
23d Virginia, Lieut. Col. Simeon T. Walton.
37th Virginia, Col. T. V. Williams.

Nicholls' (Fourth) Brigade
(1) Brig. Gen. F. T. NICHOLLS
(2) Col. J. M. WILLIAMS

1st Louisiana, Capt. E. D. Willett.
2d Louisiana:
       Col. J. M. Williams.
       Lieut. Col. R. E. Burke.
10th Louisiana, Lieut. Col. John M. Legett.
14th Louisiana, Lieut. Col. D. Zable.
15th Louisiana, Capt. William C. Michie.

Artillery
Lieut. Col. H. P. JONES

Carrington's (Virginia) battery (Charlottesville Artillery).
Garber's (Virginia) battery (Staunton Artillery).
Latimer's (Virginia) battery (Courtney Artillery).
Thompson's battery (Louisiana Guard Artillery).

ARTILLERY RESERVE
Col. S. CRUTCHFIELD

Brown's Battalion
Col. J. THOMPSON BROWN

Brooke's (Virginia) battery (Brooke Artillery).
Dance's (Virginia) battery (Powhatan Artillery).
Graham's (Virginia) battery (Rockbridge Artillery )
Hupp's (Virginia) battery (Salem Artillery).
Smith's battery (3d Richmond Howitzers).
Watson's battery (2d Richmond Howitzers).

McIntosh's Battalion
Maj. D. G. MCINTOSH

Hurt's (Alabama) battery.
Johnson's (Virginia) battery.
Lusk's (Virginia) battery.
Wooding's (Virginia) battery Danville

RESERVE ARTILLERY
Brig. Gen. WILLIAM N. PENDLETON

Sumter (Ga.) Battalion
Lieut. Col. A. S. CUTTS

Patterson's battery (B).
Ross' battery (A).
Wingfield's battery (C).

Nelson's Battalion
Lieut. Col. W. NELSON

Kirkpatrick's (Virginia) battery (Amherst Artillery).
Massie's (Virginia) battery (Fluvanna Artillery ).
Milledge's (Georgia) battery.

CAVALRY
Maj. Gen. JAMES E. B. STUART

First Brigade
Brig. Gen. WADE HAMPTON

1st North Carolina.
1st South Carolina.
2d South Carolina.
Cobb's Georgia Legion.
Phillips' Georgia Legion.

Second Brigade
Brig. Gen. FITZHUGH LEE

1st Virginia.
2d Virginia.
3d Virginia, Col. Thomas H. Owen.
4th Virginia, Col. Williams C. Wickham.

Third Brigade
Brig. Gen. W. H. F. LEE

2d North Carolina, Lieut. Col. W. H. Payne.
5th Virginia, Col. T. L. Rosser.
9th Virginia, Col. R. L. T. Beale.
10th Virginia.
13th Virginia, Col. John R. Chambliss, jr.
15th Virginia.

Fourth Brigade
Brig. Gen. WILLIAM E. JONES

1st Maryland Battalion, Maj. Ridgely Brown.
6th Virginia, Lieut. Col. John Shac Green.
7th Virginia, Lieut. Col. Thomas Marshall.
11th Virginia, Col. L. L. Lomax.
12th Virginia, Col. A. W. Harman.
34th Virginia Battalion, Lieut. Col. V. A. Witcher.
35th Virginia Battalion, Lieut. Col. Elijah V. White.

Horse Artillery
Maj. R. F. BECKHAM

Lynchburg Beauregards, Capt. M. N. Moorman.
Stuart Horse Artillery, Capt. James Breathed.
Virginia Battery,  Capt. William M. McGregor.
Washington (S.C.) Artillery, Capt. James F. Hart.

Source:  Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies

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Lee-Jackson Meeting at Chancellorsville (National Park Service)

(Related reading below.)

Recommended Reading: Chancellorsville, by Stephen W. Sears. Description: Chancellorsville was one of the Civil War's pivotal campaigns, a great victory for the South that also led directly to the death of top Confederate general Stonewall Jackson. It hasn't generated the amount of literature devoted to most major Civil War battles, largely because John Bigelow's 1910 classic, The Campaign of Chancellorsville, seemed for years to offer the last word. But Sears, employing a mix of published and unpublished primary accounts to buttress secondary studies, manages to offer more than one new word in a thoroughly engaging text. Continued below...

Most notable is his use of Union military intelligence reports to show how General Joseph Hooker was fed a stream of accurate information about Robert E. Lee's troops; conversely, Sears points out the battlefield communications failures that hampered the Union army at critical times. He also examines the roles of Hooker and his corps commanders, finding that half of the latter poorly served their commander during the campaign. Regarding the Confederate command, Sears analyzes Lee's faulty intelligence and his relationships with his subordinates. Throughout, he highlights Lee's marvelous good luck, as well as his army's tenacious fighting capability. One of the book's three appendices explores several of the battle's "romances", e.g., Jackson's wounding, Alfred Pleasonton's false stories, while two other appendices present orders of battle and casualties. A model campaign study, Sears's account of Chancellorsville is likely to remain the standard for years to come… It also includes numerous previously non-published maps and photos.

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Recommended Reading: Chancellorsville 1863: The Souls of the Brave. Description: Ferguson's book about Chancellorsville reads much like a vintage Stephen Sears book. Meticulous detail is crafted with primary accounts and combined with author analysis, and the book has a detailed narrative with human elements. Reading these types of accounts concerning Civil War battles is always enjoyable. Continued below...

Where Furgurson's book differs from Sears's book is, of course, the analysis of Joe Hooker's management of the campaign. While Sears blames subordinates, most notably Howard, and points to Hooker's concussion, Furgurson mentions the exploding pillar incident, adds soldier accounts of seeing Hooker looking drunk and unresponsive at headquarters and takes Hooker to task. Given Hooker's pre-victory celebratory orders and his subsequent defeat, I think it's hard to let Hooker completely off the hook. Furgurson also mentions near the end of the book that Jackson's death affected Gettysburg and ultimately the war. Had Jackson lived and taken Culp's Hill on July 1 in place of the inactive Ewell, the Union would have been forced to retreat, likely to the line of defense around Pipe Creek that Meade was aiming for in the first place. Would the Confederates have won the battle of Gettysburg in that case?

 

Recommended Reading: Chancellorsville: The Battle and Its Aftermath (Military Campaigns of the Civil War). Description: A variety of important but lesser-known dimensions of the Chancellorsville campaign of spring 1863 are explored in this collection of eight original essays. Departing from the traditional focus on generalship and tactics, the contributors address the campaign's broad context and implications and revisit specific battlefield episodes that have in the past been poorly understood. Chancellorsville was a remarkable victory for Robert E. Lee's troops, a fact that had enormous psychological importance for both sides, which had met recently at Fredericksburg and would meet again at Gettysburg in just two months. Continued below...

But the achievement, while stunning, came at an enormous cost: more than 13,000 Confederates became casualties, including Stonewall Jackson, who was wounded by friendly fire and died several days later. The topics covered in this volume include the influence of politics on the Union army, the importance of courage among officers, the impact of the war on children, and the state of battlefield medical care. Other essays illuminate the important but overlooked role of Confederate commander Jubal Early, reassess the professionalism of the Union cavalry, investigate the incident of friendly fire that took Stonewall Jackson's life, and analyze the military and political background of Confederate colonel Emory Best's court-martial on charges of abandoning his men. Contributors: Keith S. Bohannon, Pennsylvania State University; Gary W. Gallagher, Pennsylvania State University; A. Wilson Greene, Petersburg, Virginia; John J. Hennessy, Fredericksburg, Virginia; Robert K. Krick, Fredericksburg, Virginia; James Marten, Marquette University; Carol Reardon, Pennsylvania State University; James I. Robertson, Jr., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.

 

Recommended Reading: Lee's Lieutenants: A Study in Command (912 pages). Description: Hailed as one of the greatest Civil War books, this exhaustive study is an abridgement of the original three-volume version. It is a history of the Army of Northern Virginia from the first shot fired to the surrender at Appomattox - but what makes this book unique is that it incorporates a series of biographies of more than 150 Confederate officers. The book discusses in depth all the tradeoffs that were being made politically and militarily by the South. Continued below.

The book does an excellent job describing the battles, then at a critical decision point in the battle, the book focuses on an officer - the book stops and tells the biography of that person, and then goes back to the battle and tells what information the officer had at that point and the decision he made. At the end of the battle, the officers decisions are critiqued based on what he "could have known and what he should have known" given his experience, and that is compared with 20/20 hindsight. "It is an incredibly well written book!"

 

Recommended Reading: Guide to the Battles of Chancellorsville and Fredericksburg. Description: The battles of Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, 1862-63, were remarkable in several respects. Both revealed the problems of mounting a serious attack at night and provided the first examples of the now-familiar trench warfare. Fredericksburg featured street fighting and river crossings under fire. Chancellorsville was marked by Stonewall Jackson's death and the rare instance of mounted cavalry attacking infantry. In addition, the latter battle also demonstrated in striking fashion the profound influence of the commander on the battle. The Union committed more soldiers, supplies, money, and better equipment than did the Confederacy, and yet Lee won. Continued below...

Eyewitness accounts by battle participants make these guides an invaluable resource for travelers and non-travelers who want a greater understanding of five of the most devastating yet influential years in our nation's history. Explicit directions to points of interest and maps--illustrating the action and showing the detail of troop position, roads, rivers, elevations, and tree lines as they were 130 years ago--help bring the battles to life. In the field, these guides can be used to recreate each battle's setting and proportions, giving the reader a sense of the tension and fear each soldier must have felt as he faced his enemy.

 

Recommended Reading: Chancellorsville 1863 (Osprey Trade Editions). Description: General Joseph Hooker's attack was calculated to take his army to Richmond and end the war. Faced with an army twice the size of his own, Robert E. Lee split his forces, leaving Early to fend off Hooker's Fredericksburg attack, whilst ‘Stonewall’ Johnson was sent to take the Federal right flank by surprise. The Bringing History to Life collection is made up of Osprey's all-time favorite titles, re-released with striking new covers - selected titles also include visitor information sections.

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