North Carolina Census 1790 to 1990

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North Carolina Census Records by Race and National Origin

North Carolina Census 1790 to 1990

Table 48.  North Carolina - Race and Origin:  1790 to 1990
(See text for sources, definitions, and explanations)  Table with row headers in column A and column headers in rows 3 to 5
    Race    
       
Census year Total
population
White Black American
Indian,
Eskimo,
and Aleut
Asian
and
Pacific
Islander
Other
race
Hispanic
origin
(of any
race)
White, not
of Hispanic
origin
(lead dot indicates sub-part)                
NUMBER                
1990 ................................................................................ 6,628,637 5,008,491 1,456,323 80,155 52,166 31,502 76,726 4,971,127
.   Sample ................................................................................ 6,628,637 5,011,248 1,455,340 82,606 50,395 29,048 69,020 4,977,281
1980 ............................................................................... 5,881,766 4,457,507 1,318,857 64,652 21,176 19,574 56,667 4,428,567
.   Sample ................................................................................ 5,881,766 4,460,570 1,319,054 65,960 23,150 13,032 56,039 4,430,653
1970 ............................................................................... 5,082,059 3,901,767 1,126,478 44,406 5,617 3,791 (NA) (NA)
.   15% sample/1 ............................................................................... 5,082,036 3,906,701 1,125,545 43,614 (NA) (NA) 22,611 3,886,911
.   5% sample ...............................................................................    5,082,059   3,903,355   1,126,310 (NA) (NA) (NA) 43,414 3,868,275
1960 ................................................................................ 4,556,155 3,399,285 1,116,021 38,129 2,012 708 (NA) (NA)
                 
1950 ................................................................................ 4,061,929 2,983,121 1,047,353 3,742 551 27,162 (NA) (NA)
1940/2 ............................................................................... 3,571,623 2,567,635 981,298 22,546 144 (X) 180   2,567,455
.   5% sample/2 ............................................................................... (NA) 2,567,920 (NA) (NA) (NA) (X) 180 2,567,740
1930 ................................................................................ 3,170,276 2,234,958 918,647 16,579 92 (X) (NA) (NA)
1920 ................................................................................ 2,559,123 1,783,779 763,407 11,824 113 (X) (NA) (NA)
1910 ............................................................................... 2,206,287 1,500,511 697,843 7,851 82 (X) (NA) (NA)
1900 .............................................................................. 1,893,810 1,263,603 624,469 5,687 51 (X) (NA) (NA)
1890/3 ............................................................................... 1,617,949 1,055,382 561,018 1,516 33 (X) (NA) (NA)
                 
1890/4 ............................................................................... 1,617,947 1,055,382 561,018 1,514 33 (X) (NA) (NA)
1880  ............................................................................... 1,399,750 867,242 531,277 1,230 1 Black
1870  ............................................................................... 1,071,361 678,470 391,650 1,241 - Total Free Slave
1860  .............................................................................. 992,622 629,942 361,522 1,158 - 361,522 30,463 331,059
1850  ............................................................................... 869,039 553,028 316,011 (NA) (NA) 316,011 27,463 288,548
1840  .............................................................................. 753,419 484,870 268,549 (NA) (NA) 268,549 22,732 245,817
1830  ............................................................................... 737,987 472,843 265,144 (NA) (NA) 265,144 19,543 245,601
1820  .............................................................................. 638,829 419,200 219,629 (NA) (NA) 219,629 14,712 204,917
1810  ............................................................................. 556,526 377,374 179,152 (NA) (NA) 179,152 10,268 168,884
1800  .............................................................................. 478,103 337,764 140,339 (NA) (NA) 140,339 7,043 133,296
1790  ............................................................................. 393,751 288,204 105,547 (NA) (NA) 105,547 4,975 100,572
                 
PERCENT                
1990 ................................................................................ 100.0 75.6 22.0 1.2 0.8 0.5 1.2 75.0
.   Sample ................................................................................ 100.0 75.6 22.0 1.2 0.8 0.4 1.0 75.1
1980 ............................................................................... 100.0 75.8 22.4 1.1 0.4 0.3 1.0 75.3
.   Sample ................................................................................ 100.0 75.8 22.4 1.1 0.4 0.2 1.0 75.3
1970 ............................................................................... 100.0 76.8 22.2 0.9 0.1 0.1 (NA) (NA)
.   15% sample/1 ............................................................................... 100.0 76.9 22.1 0.9 (NA) (NA) 0.4 76.5
.   5% sample ............................................................................... 100.0 76.8 22.2 (NA) (NA) (NA) 0.9 76.1
1960 ................................................................................ 100.0 74.6 24.5 0.8 - - (NA) (NA)
                 
1950 ................................................................................ 100.0 73.4 25.8 0.1 - 0.7 (NA) (NA)
1940 ............................................................................... 100.0 71.9 27.5 0.6 - (X) (NA) (NA)
.   5% sample/2 ............................................................................... (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (X) - 71.9
1930 ................................................................................ 100.0 70.5 29.0 0.5 - (X) (NA) (NA)
1920 ................................................................................ 100.0 69.7 29.8 0.5 - (X) (NA) (NA)
1910 ............................................................................... 100.0 68.0 31.6 0.4 - (X) (NA) (NA)
1900 .............................................................................. 100.0 66.7 33.0 0.3 - (X) (NA) (NA)
1890/3 ............................................................................... 100.0 65.2 34.7 0.1 - (X) (NA) (NA)
                 
1890/4 ............................................................................... 100.0 65.2 34.7 0.1 - (X) (NA) (NA)
1880  ............................................................................... 100.0 62.0 38.0 0.1 - Black
1870  ............................................................................... 100.0 63.3 36.6 0.1 - Total Free Slave
1860  .............................................................................. 100.0 63.5 36.4 0.1 - 100.0 8.4 91.6
1850  ............................................................................... 100.0 63.6 36.4 (NA) (NA) 100.0 8.7 91.3
1840  .............................................................................. 100.0 64.4 35.6 (NA) (NA) 100.0 8.5 91.5
1830  ............................................................................... 100.0 64.1 35.9 (NA) (NA) 100.0 7.4 92.6
1820  .............................................................................. 100.0 65.6 34.4 (NA) (NA) 100.0 6.7 93.3
1810  ............................................................................. 100.0 67.8 32.2 (NA) (NA) 100.0 5.7 94.3
1800  .............................................................................. 100.0 70.6 29.4 (NA) (NA) 100.0 5.0 95.0
1790  ............................................................................. 100.0 73.2 26.8 (NA) (NA) 100.0 4.7 95.3
Footnotes:
 - Represents zero or rounds to 0.0.  (X) Not applicable.  (NA) Not available.  1/Hispanic origin based on Spanish language.  2/Hispanic origin based on the White
    population of Spanish mother tongue.  Percentages shown based on sample data prorated to the 100-percent count of the White population and on the
    100-percent count of the total population. These estimates are in italics. See Table E-6 and text.  3/Includes Indian reservations.  4/Excludes Indian reservations.   
Source:  U. S. Census Bureau
Internet Release Date:  September 13, 2002

Recommended Reading: The Tar Heel State: A History of North Carolina (Hardcover). Description: The Tar Heel State: A History of North Carolina constitutes the most comprehensive and inclusive single-volume chronicle of the state’s storied past to date, culminating with an attentive look at recent events that have transformed North Carolina into a southern megastate. Integrating tales of famous pioneers, statesmen, soldiers, farmers, captains of industry, activists, and community leaders with more marginalized voices, including those of Native Americans, African Americans, and women, Milton Ready gives readers a view of North Carolina that encompasses perspectives and personalities from the coast, "tobacco road," the Piedmont, and the mountains in this sweeping history of the Tar Heel State. The first such volume in more than two decades, Ready’s work offers a distinctive view of the state’s history built from myriad stories and episodes. The Tar Heel State is enhanced by one hundred and ninety illustrations and five maps. Continued below...

Ready begins with a study of the state’s geography and then invites readers to revisit dramatic struggles of the American Revolution and Civil War, the early history of Cherokees, the impact of slavery as an institution, the rise of industrial mills, and the changes wrought by modern information-based technologies since 1970. Mixing spirited anecdotes and illustrative statistics, Ready describes the rich Native American culture found by John White in 1585, the chartered chaos of North Carolina’s proprietary settlement, and the chronic distrust of government that grew out of settlement patterns and the colony’s early political economy. He challenges the perception of relaxed intellectualism attributed to the "Rip van Winkle" state, the notion that slavery was a relatively benign institution in North Carolina, and the commonly accepted interpretation of Reconstruction in the state. Ready also discusses how the woman suffrage movement pushed North Carolina into a hesitant twentieth-century progressivism. In perhaps his most significant contribution to North Carolina’s historical record, Ready continues his narrative past the benchmark of World War II and into the twenty-first century. From the civil rights struggle to the building of research triangles, triads, and parks, Ready recounts the events that have fueled North Carolina’s accelerated development in recent years and the many challenges that have accompanied such rapid growth, especially those of population change and environmental degradation.

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